Tag Archives: New Zealand

Sexual abuse of boys will see New Zealand continue to raise angry young men

Today I met a young guy in Kaitaia whose life experiences replicate the story of this gang member, and which saw him go to prison and find an escape in “P”.

The sexual and physical abuse of boys is under-reported and misunderstood.

I support Ken Clearwater who in this video says there needs to be more research on the sexual abuse of males.

Failure to address the sexual abuse of boys will see New Zealand continue to raise angry young men who struggle to live to their potential and are often likely to end up in prison hurting many others along the way.

This just fuels the call of certain sectors of society to lock more people up. Building more prisons is not a pathway to economic, cultural or social success.

Sexual abuse is most likely to be perpetrated by someone a boy knows, loves and should be able to trust.

We need more men to speak out about sexual violence.

Kelvin Davis, Labour MP for Te Tai Tokerau

Prime Minister John Key receives a science briefing…

key-beans

I imagine New Zealand’s going to keep calm over this, will send sheep

I imagine New Zealand’s going to keep calm over this, will send sheep.

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ind.pn/22AZRlP

Saudi Arabia ‘jails man for telling the truth’ about work conditions :

ind.pn/22AZRlP

Can we stop with the lame post-protest conversations and opinionated think pieces please?

In her Herald on Sunday column this week Heather Du Plessis-Allan suggested some silly people came along to last Thursday’s anti-Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) protests and ruined everything, and now the country will never want to talk about free trade ever again – because, well – bad protesters. I imagine a ‘good protester’ to Du Plessis-Allan is someone who quietly marches waving an inoffensive placard, in an inoffensive way, accompanied by an inoffensive chant, asking to have an inoffensive conversation, with some inoffensive people – someone, who even Mike Hosking’s so-called “regular New Zealanders” could give their inoffensive nod of approval too.

tppa fck

Guess what guys, the revolution was never meant to be inoffensive, nor something easily slotted in between a pedicure and picking the kids up at three. Protesting, by its nature, is an inconvenience. If it doesn’t make the viewer uncomfortable it is not doing its job. Also protesting, or the right to protest, is a democratic right in our country – we literally go to war in other countries to afford their peoples the same rights. Let that sink in for a minute. While the boys and girls of our Fourth Estate reduce serious issues to ‘silly protesters’ and ‘traffic inconveniences’ – we send men and women to potentially die in foreign lands to give or to restore to a foreign citizen, their right to protest and inconvenience their governments. The very same rights it would seem that some people here would rather we didn’t have.

I don’t want to watch, or read, or hear another talking head whine about protesting “riff-raff” and “rent-a-crowd”. I want to watch, read, and hear them instead discuss the issues being protested, for, or against. Let’s not forget some media personalities are paid very well to do this, so why are they still struggling with the fundamentals of our democracy and getting away with it? Let alone being paid for that struggle? If Hosking for example can’t figure it out, please someone dear god explain it to him, and please let that someone not be Toni Street. Every time we allow important conversations to be derailed by lowest common denominator sound bites churned out to even lower common denominator audiences, we do New Zealand a disservice. We do our kids a disservice.

Not just content with sticking the knife into ‘bad protesters’ for giving protesting a bad image and turning people off talking about the TPPA, Du Plessis-Allan claims their actions single-handedly sent “ordinary people” – which I can only assume is Du Plessis-Allan ‘speak’ for Hosking’s “regular New Zealanders” – into the moderate and welcoming arms of the TPPA proponents. Really? Do we have evidence of this? Or is this something Du Plessis-Allan made up because she had a 500 word limit to fulfil? If so-called “ordinary” New Zealanders don’t understand the TPPA as she alleges and a bunch of protesters can scare them off, then that’s not the fault of the protester, that’s her fault, she is the journalist after all.

tppa down with

What has she done the past eight years to elucidate the masses? She derides and ridicules protesters for their ignorance in the face of a knowledge vacuum, but lets her so-called “ordinary people” and Hosking’s “real New Zealanders” off the hook, despite their own very obvious ignorance due to the same information void. The TPPA came out of the last decade when the United States wished to join the four country Trans-Pacific Economic Partnership Agreement (TPSEP) – so it has literally been a thing since January 2008. Why are we so ignorant to this agreement eight years on? Why are people fearful of not just it but many of its clauses? Can our broadcasters really say they’ve done their very best to give people not just credible, but also the factual information they would need to have to take a well-rounded position on it? I don’t think so.

It seems a major goal in the TPPA debate for some time now has being to avoid pushing for answers on contentious provisions in the agreement from the negotiating Executive, and instead drill non-negotiating opposition parties on their stance. Demanding to know if they are anti-free trade for example, because they, inexplicably it seems to some media, dare to question parts of the agreement while supporting others. For some, it’s like the media are fighting the fire in the letterbox while behind them the house burns. No wonder people are scared and effectively screaming at their screens, and now screaming into our screens, at the journalistic equivalent of the horror movie victim not heeding our warnings to ‘look behind’ them. If people for, against and everything between, are still ignorant of this agreement this late in the game, some feeling anxious, desperate and fearful, then someone’s not doing their job – or someone else is doing their job too a little too well.

On Radio New Zealand last week, ex Labour Party politician and Speaker of the House, Margaret Wilson, now Professor of Law and Public Policy at University of Waikato said this of the protesters and their perceived ignorance,

non vs violent

“Why they’re bothering is that somehow or another people feel they have to express to their government their feelings about both [the] process [of the TPPA], and [the] content in many ways as well, because they haven’t had any other opportunity to do so. In New Zealand’s constitutional arrangement, [protest] is the way in which the people, the only way really, substantially, [that people can] communicate directly [with the Executive].”

Du Plessis-Allan though bless her, hopes middle New Zealand will stay strong in the face of inconvenient protests and inner city traffic jams, and no matter how tedious, carry on the apparently newly started, but nevertheless important TPPA conversation. It’s almost like Du Plessis-Allan has only just realised the importance of it, let alone known that some of us have being desperately screaming out for us to have this conversation for some time. See what I did there Heather?

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” – John F. Kennedy

Like it or not dear reader, the thousands of protesters who turned up last Thursday, and the many people who wish they could have, are not the people who need their actions questioned right now.

Viva la revolution.

John Key talks free tertiary education

OD: “Finally on education, in your first State of the Nation speech you spoke about the opportunity you had for a good education. Kids today end up with an average student debt of $28,000 to get the same education as you did. Any plans to go back to tertiary education, free tertiary education?”

JK: “I don’t know if we’d go back free…” (continued below)

"Let's Be Frank" with Oliver Driver, ALT TV, 6 March, 2008,  1.06 - 5.29 
 

OD: “Why not?”

JK: “Um, sheer cost of it I guess. It’s about…”

OD: “$350 million a year.”

JK: “Yeah. I guess what would you do with the $9 billion of student loans.”

OD: (partly unaudible, possibly ‘scrap em’)

JK: “there’s equity issues..”

OD: “C’mon lets look at you, here you are, the perfect example of a man who was born into a state house, made good, got his education, was able to go to university because it was free.”

JK: “Yeah.”

OD: “Ya know, got to the place where you are.”

JK: “Yeah.”

OD: “And now, you might be our prime minister.”

JK: “Yeah.”

OD: “And yet the next generation of John Keys’ have to pay $28,000 in student loans, if they can get a student loan in the first place.”

JK: “Yeah. Look there’s a number of different parts of that right. Firstly, probably, that tertiary education is widened out substantially to where it was. So a lot of those students, I mean the loans aren’t necessarily um related to, ya know tertiary qualifications, they’re actually around – well they are tertiary but not university per se, they might be a whole lot of other sort of areas.”

OD: “Sure, but it is estimated around $350 million is all we would need to provide free tertiary education.”

JK: “Yeah. Well {int}”

OD: “Now surely with the massive surpluses you keep going on about and the huge desire we have for ‘tax cuts’, we can afford these ‘tax cuts’ because of these huge surpluses. You could give every kid in this country back to having free tertiary education.”

JK: “I guess what I want to say to you is look, I mean we are looking at things like student allowances and all those sort of things. We made it clear we’re going to keep loans at zero percent, and we’ve made it clear, if you repay early , and some will, they’ll get a 10% discount on that.”

OD: “But you didn’t have to do it.”

JK: “I know.”

OD: “And look at where you are?”

JK: “Yeah but the issue..”

OD: “And you’re worried about the brain drain, you’re worried about upskilling our people, and you’re worried about all these sorts of things and yet, that, seems to me one of the most basic things you could do.”

JK: “And there are some areas where we could do that right and we’ve argued that we want to ‘bond’ doctors or might want to certain things with teachers, and write off their student loans, which is the virtually the same thing. I mean wholesale could we do it I dunno, we could look at it. I mean one thing I could say to you is, and this is what I say to young people when I go out to all of the schools all the time – if you’ve got a chance, go to university don’t worry about the student loan, that is the least of your problems but do two things, finish the degree…”

OD: “It’s not the least of their problems once they graduate, I know them.”

JK: “Yeah”

OD: “They’re walking around with $28,000, $40,000, $60,000 dollar debts around their necks, while you were in your first year of work, earning your first amount of cash, they’re hard slog paying back their debt.”

JK: “Yeah”

OD: “To be an educated part of society.”

JK: “Yeah. I mean yeah, you’ve got to look at it and say, “hey what’s driving those costs”, so what is your average course fee at university? About $4000 dollars are year? That sort of number? Probably. Um, I haven’t looked recently, but I guess it’s that sort of number. So, so a lot of what is driving that debt is because they are living away from home right? Now, so, had I been at university and lived away from home – I mean I know I had the luxury of being able to live at home, and I was in Christchurch, and I could go to Canterbury – but the bottom line is, I would have racked up debt then too. I mean, even back in my day, it was only the fees that were paid. So.”

OD: “So do that.”

JK: “Yeah, well that’s a possibility I suppose. I’m just saying, I understand where you are coming from and I’m not disagreeing with you. We want people to go and we don’t want people racked down with debt; and one of the reasons I didn’t like zero percent loans, and I was open about it in the campaign in 2005, was I was really worried people would take down more debt, and that actually even shows, they have, and for longer.”

OD: “But don’t you think part of the reason people are fleeing to Australia is to escape them?”

JK: “Partly because {int} well partly, {int} partly what the problem is I think, is they get this debt and while they’re at university it doesn’t seem that much, they say “ok, I owe $30,000 grand, well I’m gonna start working, I’ll pay it off”. As soon as they come out, there’s lots of other expenses that they hadn’t thought about – they want to move out, whatever, boyfriend, girlfriend, whatever it might be – move in, and the problem is that debt hangs around, at which point their income is higher – then they go…”

OD: “Hang on just two minutes ago you said to me you encourage kids to not worry about the debt, to go to university, the debt won’t matter, and now you’re out here telling me that debt builds up, and it’s a whole lot more expensive, and they have to run to Australia.”

JK: “No. I’ll tell you why I think it shouldn’t matter if they get debt, and the answer to that is, getting the qualification, all the academic evidence shows you, your tertiary qualified, you complete your degree, your average income earning stream is much higher. So it’s what I say to you, what I say to young people is, get the qualification, and make sure you go there, make sure you complete it.”

OD: “I’m just saying I think you should think about that. You want people to not leave for Australia. You want increase our national average income. Surely free tertiary education is a way to achieve both of those things. In some part. ”

(Please report any transcribing errors below, thank you)

It’s called public service for a reason

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Bad title: politicians are not ‘celebrities’ and shouldn’t be treated as one. It’s called public service for a reason.

Key’s biggest lie of all: his 1991 statement to the Equiticorp inquiry

The Standard has a posted an updated listing today of John Key’s lies. There’s a lot of them.

One lie that doesn’t often make these lists is what I believe to be the biggest lie of all: his 1991 statement to the Equiticorp inquiry.

john-key-three-in-a-row

In July 1990 New Zealand’s newly formed Serious Fraud Office were charged with investigating the shambles that was Equiticorp and it’s now infamous founder Alan Hawkins.  Unraveling a ledger entry called ‘H-Fee’ ultimately saw Australia’s SFO equivalent, the now defunct National Crime Authority, assist with the Equiticorp investigation.  While the SFO pursued Hawkins over Equiticorp, the NCA went after Australian based Elders IXL and it’s founder John Elliot over the ‘H-Fee’ entries. It was alleged that $67 million (NZ$76) in fraudulent foreign exchange transactions were made in two payments to Equiticorp to pay back Hawkins for his assistance in Elliot’s 1986 takeover battle for steelmaking giant BHP.

Two years early on 26 August 1988, setting in motion the second  (A$27 million) of the ‘H-Fee’ payments, Elders IXL executive Ken Jarrett had met with Elders Merchant Finance manager Peter Camm and head of foreign exchange, Paul Richards in Wellington. The transaction was completed on 7 September 1988.

One week before been elected Prime Minister of New Zealand in November 2008, Key was asked about the truthfulness of this statement. He said it was 100% truthful, 100% correct and anything else was “a smear campaign by a desperate left”.

Is it a smear if an accusation is true?

When the NCA brought charges against Elliot and other Elders IXL executives, Peter Camm and Paul Richards were also facing fraud charges. In May 1991, now working at Bankers Trust, Key was asked to corroborate a part of Richards statement, namely a lunch he claimed that two had on 31 August 1988.

Richards was alleging it was the 31st and not the 26th that he and Camm had met with Jarrett that August. The trader was adamant of the date and told investigators he could recall the “lunch” and it’s “date”, as it was a “farewell” for “John Key” who was leaving the firm to go to Bankers Trust. Key agreed with Richards recollection of events and made a statement to the investigation reflecting that.

Except Key worked with New York based currency raider Andrew Krieger while they were both at Bankers Trust. This relationship has been confirmed by Key’s then boss, Gavin Walker. Walker has said of the relationship, that it was more or less in Key’s job description to look after Krieger, saying on Key’s first day with Bankers Trust he gave Key a list of their top clients, of which Krieger was one of them. Key himself has said he will never forget his first call with Krieger, where he asked Key about New Zealand’s GDP and it’s monetary supply.

For Key to have worked with Krieger, of which there is no doubt, then he would have had to have left Elders Merchant Finance in August 1987, and not 1988 as told to investigators, as Krieger resigned from Bankers Trust in February 1988. By June 1988 he had retired from the currency markets altogether, not returning to them until 1990. Readers may also recall Key told a reporter in 2007 he had indeed left Elders Merchant Finance in 1987 but called that a mistake when his 1991 Equiticorp statement surfaced a year later.

If Key wishes the New Zealand public to believe he was telling the truth to them in 2008 when as a wanna be prime minister, he assured them his 1991 Equiticorp statement was 100% true and correct, then he needs to explain to us how he, in late 1988, supposedly began working so closely with a world infamous currency trader who was no longer working in the currency markets. He also needs to explain how Walker, now Chair of the Board of Guardians of the New Zealand Superfund, could have his recollection so wrong as well.

What authorities need to know is, knowingly misleading a Serious Fraud Office investigation carries a maximum fine of $15,000 and/or 12 months imprisonment. Not too mention the possibly criminal issue of Key and Richards conspiring to mislead an investigation.

While some might question whether or not Key lying in his youth has any bearing on the man today, the facts are some 55,000 Equiticorp shareholders were defrauded of over $400 million dollars.

If Key was willing to lie to protect those involved in facilitating some of that fraud, does he continue to lie today to protect himself?

In his book ‘Dirty Collars’ ex SFO head Charles Sturt says this of the vast powers bestowed on his department,

“while a person may be compelled to answer questions, these answers may only be used in evidence if the accused subsequently gives evidence inconsistent with their previous statements”

John Key, did you lie to the Serious Fraud Office?

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Nicky Hager warned us about this.

When releasing ‘Dirty Politics’ last year, Nicky Hager asked that the takeaway from the book be not that John Key has bad taste in friends, but that the government’s PR machine was increasingly running spin, and shutting down, shutting out, or simply shutting up bad news. I don’t know enough about politics through the ages, but I’m pretty sure some pretty shit regimes have used these tactics too. Please wake up, this is not our New Zealand.

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My police file: 17 pages blacked out

Australian prime minister suggests John Key is bit of a ‘role model’.

Would Turnbull and Obama think as positively about Key if they knew Key had lied to an early ’90s trans-Tasman investigation into high flying corporates on both our shores?

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Key was interviewed by Australia’s (now defunct) National Crime Authority and New Zealand’s (then newly established) Serious Fraud Office in May 1991. The evidence he gave to the investigation included a dated timeline for him leaving one job for another. However with a little light shed on it, it’s easy to see this timeline is an impossibility.

In 2008, one week before that year’s general election and he was elected prime minister for the first time, Key’s statement to the investigation surfaced. He told curious media his statement was “100% correct” and any talk to the contrary was nothing but a smear campaign by a “desperate left.”

Further reading:

“Can Australia’s media do what New Zealand’s so far hasn’t?”
“John Key did you lie to the Serious Fraud Office.”

Which of these currency traders turned politicians lied to a 1990’s joint Oz & NZ investigation into corporate fraud?

Which of these currency traders turned politicians lied to a 1990’s joint Australia & New Zealand investigation into corporate fraud?

Jon Key Malcolm Turnbull Currency Traders turned Politicans

More info in the links below:

“Where the bloody hell are you?” Could Australia’s media do what New Zealand’s so far hasn’t?

John Key did you lie to the Serious Fraud Office?

The current flag as sixth option to be added to the 1st flag referendum.

Flag It

I support this petition 100% and am happy to put my name too it.

My submission supporting this petition: 

The argument for the two-step referendum process was that voters needed to see which flag design the current flag would be up against before knowing if they would want to change to it or not.  Except people already know whether or not they are going to vote to change the flag.  Therefore two-step process is a waste time, money, debate and resources.

Then today parliament made even more of a farce of an already flawed process by effectively rejecting the final four designs when they voted to include Aaron Dustin’s Red Peak in the first of referendums. This action is akin to bringing back a wildcard in a badly run talent contest, except this one is a bizarre parliamentary version of New Zealand’s Flags’ Got Talent and it’s crap, and it’s costing taxpayers $26 million dollars.

The only honest course of action going forward is for the government to hold just one referendum which sees the current flag going head-to-head with the five alternatives.

One referendum, one vote, one flag, one time.

If you support this petition too, please sign and share.

Flangst: a feeling of deep anxiety or dread

flangst

/flangst/

noun

a feeling of deep anxiety or dread, typically an unfocused one about changing New Zealand’s flag or the state of the flag change process in general.

“not having a Yes/No vote in the first referendum has caused unnecessary angst amongst voters, especially those who do not want to change”

synonyms: anxiety, fear, dread, apprehension, worry, perturbation, foreboding, trepidation, malaise, distress, disquiet, disquietude, unease, uneasiness; rare inquietude

flangst

Peak Red & the Great New Zealand Flag Off

Red Peakers who are calling for Aaron Dustin’s longlisted Red Peak design to be included in the first flag referendum are quickly peaking my peaking head in. I am no more a fan of the Drab Four flags that the 40 Shades of Beige panel offered up from the bland 39 available to them (or is that now 38 since the NZRU called copyright on the silver fern on black) than I am of any of those left on the longlist. Therefore it will come as no surprise that I’m not here championing the call for the inclusion of one more. Was there actually a groundswell of public support for including Red Peak in the Great New Zealand Flag Off? Or is it simply a social media bubble being paraded as a “movement”?

Red Peak

Campaigns have to start from somewhere of course, but this #RedPeak one has a very manufactured Lewis Road Creamery-esque social-media-hype-parading-as-news feel about it. In LRC’s defence, the online hype they achieved very quickly solidified into actual bona-fide mania, resulting in genuinely newsworthy product shortages and prime time product promotion. But I don’t think Red Peak is actually there yet – hence querying its sudden ‘newsworthiness’. Or is it people are so uninspired, so dejected by what amounted to a nationwide colouring-in competition, that they’re clinging to the first thing in this process that feels like it might actually have some citizens initiated passion behind it? That is, something that wasn’t foisted upon us from on high by lofty New Zealanders and not so lofty politicians. Is that what makes it newsworthy?

40 shades of beige panel

Now, as I said above, I am not a fan of any flags in the longlist and this sudden rise of #TeamPeak has not changed that, but I do wish the campaign well; if the numbers are there to support its inclusion then that’s pretty much people power in action, and that is a horse I can back. Some of the arguments for the design though could be considered questionable, so let’s start questioning them.

40 shades of beige flags

For example, the graphic below (shared on Facebook by Otis Frizzell) attempts to argue the Red Peak design has the same minimalist qualities of the Irish, French and Canadian flags and therefore is more like a ‘flag’ than Kyle Lockwood’s top-runner shortlisted flag/s. What can we say here, except with at least 11 elements to its design, Red Peak is just as ‘busy’ as the flags against which it is being compared.

Less is more

Red Peak has four individual graphics in three different sizes and it uses four different colours, also if the white is classed as a chevron and not a triangle, it too can be included. Lockwood’s has nine – 12 elements. Just because the graphics are triangles and not ferns, it does not mean they don’t clutter up the design.

Two of the minimalist flags Red Peak is being likened to, as in sharing similar qualities, have one element used three times and three colours. That’s it. These flags, the Irish and French, have anything from four – seven elements depending on if the rectangles are counted individually or not. The Canadian flag employs five – six elements, two colours, one rectangle in two sizes and one image. The Red Peak, unfortunately for its supporters, is simply not comparable to them. It is no more ‘flag like’ than Lockwood’s ferns of many colours.

There are many good arguments people can make for including another flag design in the referendum, offering another choice is one of them, but you’re drawing a long bow if you’re arguing that it should be Red Peak because it shares with many great flags the qualities of minimalism, because it actually doesn’t.

 

40 Shades of Beige

Flags only a masochist could love …

40 Shades of Beige

28 July 1893 – Today in NZHistory: Women’s suffrage petition presented to parliament

Thank you, you brave, bold, brilliant women x

The third massive suffrage petition presented to Parliament in three years, this one was signed by more than 25,000 women. A dozen other, smaller suffrage petitions were also submitted around the same time. When pro-suffrage MP Sir John Hall presented them to the House of Representatives on 11 August, he noted that together they contained the signatures of nearly 32,000 women − almost a quarter of the entire adult European female population of New Zealand.

Stay classy Stuff

Baby on the way2

White Man Behind A Desk: Money and the Media @manwithdesk

Some good stuff in here, well worth sharing. 

There just isn’t enough money to make mainstream journalism good… But who needs good when you’ve got Hey Martha!

 White Man Behind A Desk: Money and the Media @manwithdesk FB/WhiteManBehindADesk

“This week, with Campbell Live cancelled, we figure out what happened to journalism. ” 

“The Emperor’s New Clothes”

Emperor's New Clothes

The Emperor’s New Clothes

Bloody marvelous

For years now the comment sections of our nation’s online newspapers, Facebook pages and Twitter feeds have been packed with commentators declaring the ‘Campbell Live’ show and it’s watchers were ‘everything that was wrong with the country’ – somewhat ironically these same authors would then declare it was the show that needed to ‘lighten up’.

I was pondering this disconnect today when reading the Taranaki Daily News’ comments section, specifically the one attached to Rachel Stewart’s brilliant piece ‘Why you should care about John Campbell’s demise’. In it she champions the need for journalists with empathy, who can insert themselves ‘into the fight’ as John Campbell often would. In recent years not only were the CL team in the fight, they’d built themselves a boxing ring, and when the strong and powerful refused to step in, they’d take the fight on the road – literally – broadcasting viewer stories from their now infamous CL ‘caravan of complaint’.

As a viewer you’d feel every punch as these often brutal stories unfolded, yet you couldn’t help but feel you were part of something good, something bigger than yourself, and for not much in return but a few minutes of your day. People were telling their stories, having their bad experiences validated, their complex situations analysed and understood, and best of all there was often remedy and lives improved.

Tell me again why this is so wrong for our country?

Quote from a letter from TV3 news reader John Campbell to a 14 year old Dan Lake (Dan News)

Bloody marvelous.

#RedMyLips: April 30 “Be the change you wish to see in the world”

#RedMyLips April 30

Sexual violence is not a women’s issue, it is a human issue and affects all of us. The month long ‘RedMyLips’ campaign started in 2011 and aims to raise awareness and much needed discussion on this topic. This year is the first time I will participate, so check back daily as I post a new lip-smacking #RedMyLips pic.

Want to know more about the ‘Red My Lips’ campaign anti-sexual violence and anti-victim blaming campaign?

Visit their website www.redmylips.org.

#RedMyLips: April 28 “Minister for Women”

#RedMyLips April 28

Or is she?

Sexual violence is not a women’s issue, it is a human issue and affects all of us. The month long ‘RedMyLips’ campaign started in 2011 and aims to raise awareness and much needed discussion on this topic. This year is the first time I will participate, so check back daily as I post a new lip-smacking #RedMyLips pic.

Want to know more about the ‘Red My Lips’ campaign anti-sexual violence and anti-victim blaming campaign?

Visit their website www.redmylips.org.

If anyone needed a reason to watch Campbell Live, they found it tonight watching Mike Hosking

Mike Hosking Victim Shaming

If you can stomach the drivel, find Hosking’s cross here

‘No stamp duty, no land tax, and no capital gains tax!’

Can not blame people for taking advantage, when we make it so easy.

New Zealand, tenants & squatters wanted.

If the answer is “the New Zealand economy” – what was the question?

If the answer is "the New Zealand economy" - what was the question?

#RedMyLips: April 5 “When an apology, isn’t.”

#RedMyLips April 5

When an apology isn’t an apology but a denial of one’s own actions and thoughts.

See previous post for background/context.

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Sexual violence is not a women’s issue, it is a human issue and affects all of us. The month long ‘RedMyLips’ campaign started in 2011 and aims to raise awareness and much needed discussion on this topic. This year is the first time I will participate, so check back daily as I post a new lip-smacking #RedMyLips pic.

Want to know more about the ‘Red My Lips’ campaign anti-sexual violence and anti-victim blaming campaign?

Visit their website www.redmylips.org.